Lunar New Year, Dragon

The Legend of Lunar New Year

A long time ago in China, there was a large beast named Nian. Legend has it that Nian, whose name means “year”, would visit a Chinese village on the darkest night of every year.

When the new moon was at its dullest, the beast would sneak in and scare all of the villagers. Because of this, the villagers lived in fear every year when the new moon would come around.

Lunar New Year, Dull Full Moon
Lunar New Year, Red, Drums, Fireworks

Eventually, a wise man taught the villagers that Nian had weaknesses. He explained to everyone that the beast feared three things; loud noises, fire, and the color red.

Lunar New Year, History Illustration

The very next year, when Nian arrived, the villagers were prepared and scared Nian back. While wearing red from head to toe and banging loud drums with fireworks sounding off, Nian ran away and never returned.

The villagers rejoiced and began to celebrate the new moon instead of fearing it. The celebration became Lunar New Year and was celebrated for 15 days each year. It was a time of family, food, and good fortune that is still celebrated to this day.

Present Day Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year is celebrated around the world. While it remains the most celebrated festival in China, it also continues to grow around the globe. As a time to celebrate family and good fortune, many travel home to gather with their loved ones.

One of the most common ways for families to celebrate would be gathering around the table and enjoying unique home cooked dishes.

Away from the table, traditions expand to gifts and decorations. A widely known gift during festivities would be the passing of red envelopes. In addition to gifts, homes are decorated in red because of the luck, happiness, and joy the color brings to the Chinese culture.

All traditions and celebrations are carried from home to home and even to other countries around the world.

Create your own Red Envelopes,
Chinese Lanterns and more
Lunar New Year activities!

Lunar New Year, Dragon

The Legend of Lunar New Year

A long time ago in China, there was a large beast named Nian. Legend has it that Nian, whose name means “year”, would visit a Chinese village on the darkest night of every year.

Lunar New Year, Dull Full Moon

When the new moon was at its dullest, the beast would sneak in and scare all of the villagers. Because of this, the villagers lived in fear every year when the new moon would come around.

Lunar New Year, Red, Drums, Fireworks

Eventually, a wise man taught the villagers that Nian had weaknesses. He explained to everyone that the beast feared three things; loud noises, fire, and the color red.

Lunar New Year, History Illustration

The very next year, when Nian arrived, the villagers were prepared and scared Nian back. While wearing red from head to toe and banging loud drums with fireworks sounding off, Nian ran away and never returned.

The villagers rejoiced and began to celebrate the new moon instead of fearing it. The celebration became Lunar New Year and was celebrated for 15 days each year. It was a time of family, food, and good fortune that is still celebrated to this day.

Present Day Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year is celebrated around the world. While it remains the most celebrated festival in China, it also continues to grow around the globe. As a time to celebrate family and good fortune, many travel home to gather with their loved ones.

One of the most common ways for families to celebrate would be gathering around the table and enjoying unique home cooked dishes.

Away from the table, traditions expand to gifts and decorations. A widely known gift during festivities would be the passing of red envelopes. In addition to gifts, homes are decorated in red because of the luck, happiness, and joy the color brings to the Chinese culture.

All traditions and celebrations are carried from home to home and even to other countries around the world.

Create your own Red Envelopes,
Chinese Lanterns and more
Lunar New Year activities!

Lunar New Year, Dragon

The Legend of Lunar New Year

A long time ago in China, there was a large beast named Nian. Legend has it that Nian, whose name means “year”, would visit a Chinese village on the darkest night of every year.

Lunar New Year, Dull Full Moon

When the new moon was at its dullest, the beast would sneak in and scare all of the villagers. Because of this, the villagers lived in fear every year when the new moon would come around.

Lunar New Year, Red, Drums, Fireworks

Eventually, a wise man taught the villagers that Nian had weaknesses. He explained to everyone that the beast feared three things; loud noises, fire, and the color red.

Lunar New Year, History Illustration

The very next year, when Nian arrived, the villagers were prepared and scared Nian back. While wearing red from head to toe and banging loud drums with fireworks sounding off, Nian ran away and never returned.

The villagers rejoiced and began to celebrate the new moon instead of fearing it. The celebration became Lunar New Year and was celebrated for 15 days each year. It was a time of family, food, and good fortune that is still celebrated to this day.

Present Day
Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year is celebrated around the world. While it remains the most celebrated festival in China, it also continues to grow around the globe. As a time to celebrate family and good fortune, many travel home to gather with their loved ones.

One of the most common ways for families to celebrate would be gathering around the table and enjoying unique home cooked dishes.

Away from the table, traditions expand to gifts and decorations. A widely known gift during festivities would be the passing of red envelopes. In addition to gifts, homes are decorated in red because of the luck, happiness, and joy the color brings to the Chinese culture.

All traditions and celebrations are carried from home to home and even to other countries around the world.

Create your own Red Envelopes, Chinese Lanterns and more Lunar New Year activities!